Colorful Rose-Covered Water Tank Wins First Tank Of The Year Competition in 2006

The Village of Rosemont, Water Tank, Village of Rosemont Photograph
The Rosemont, IL water tower was completed in late 2006 and was the first winner of Tnemec Company’s coveted Tank of the Year Competition. The intricately-rose-painted tank has been a village landmark since its construction in 1982. Since then, the water tower has undergone two significant repaints utilizing an oil-based enamel paint in 1990 and 1998. When recoating was necessary again in 2006, Christopher Burke Engineering and the Village of Rosemont, Illinois, chose a long-lasting, durable Tnemec coating.

Ann Arbor Water Tank Wows With Stunning Mural By University of Michigan Lecturer

ann arbor water tank michigan tnemec hydroflon lumiflon feve
City officials in Ann Arbor created a contest for the best tank design to adorn the water tower near the Stadium/Washtenaw split. The winning entry was from Bill Burgard, freelance illustrator and designer and University of Michigan Stamps School of Art and Design lecturer. His design for the 500-gallon water tank features Huron River locals, the swan, sandhill crane, woodpecker, bird of prey, and bluegill fish.

High-Performance Coating System Enables Durable And Sustainable Bridge Designs Across the UK

Restoration Grade II Listed Marlow Bridge, Buckinghamshire, Unova Products
According to Nishana Nazimuddin, Brand Manager at Unova Products, "In bridge design, sustainability is a design philosophy that considers the long-term impact of the bridge not only on the environment and climate but also on society and the economy. When the primary consideration a few decades ago was 'low cost' and 'fast development', the focus is gradually shifting to sustainability priorities which start with extending the structure's lifespan."

Long-Awaited Replacement Footbridge Connects Town of Moray To Resort Beach in Lossiemouth

Lossiemouth Bridge, Moray, Scotland, Beaver Bridges, the Press and Journal Evening Express
The Lossiemouth Bridge is a long-awaited replacement footbridge over the River Lossie connecting the town of Moray with the East beach of Lossiemouth. The Scottish government-funded the highly anticipated metal bridge and replaced a 100-year-old timber footbridge that finally closed in 2019 for safety concerns. The bridge serves as the main route to the popular tourist beach and stimulates the region’s economy. However, with the bridge’s inaccessibility, the local businesses reported massive declines as the bridge averaged 4,000 visitors in the summer.
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